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Love and Money 2022: Money Dates & Financial Infidelity Amidst Couples

Money Dates & Financial Infidelity Amidst Couples

Changed work?
Owning a house or a car?
Starting a family?
Some life milestones have a huge financial impact. And when you’re in a relationship, these effects spread outside of your own wallet. After a difficult, confusing year, they may be bigger than usual.

Communication seems important.

person in black leather shoes sitting on brown wooden chair
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The hard truth is that almost a third of married couples keep financial secrets from their partner. And 50% have no intention of sharing at all. 76% of them don’t even plan to share their secrets with anyone. As before. According to TD Bank, these numbers are much higher than in 2020.

There is an expression for this: financial infidelity/betrayal. And while spending more when your partner agrees on a new dress or a nice dinner, it’s one thing hiding debt or an entire account can lead to serious relationship problems.

If you are hiding something from your significant other because you are shy, process your emotions before you say it.

Heard About Money Date?

Survey 2022 TD Bank found that most pairs are comfortable talking about talking and discussing money at least once a month.

Even if it doesn’t feel strange, do what can be done to make a convo go.

woman sitting on man s lap
Photo by cottonbro on Pexels.com

For Help: Allow the more extroverted partner to kickstart. This will help the other partner to open up. If you don’t know the subject before, you can start by sharing how much you earn and how you expect it to change over time. It will help you both set realistic life expectations.

Then give each person a chance to share their own financial boundaries. Maybe your partner will only spend a percentage of their income on food. And you can have limited rules for lending money with friends. Whatever the best thing is best to put early on the table. So you can get into the cash management plan with all cool.

Having Debts?

Another thing to cover is DEBTS. No matter how much or less you have. Because it will affect your credit score. And that can affect what is possible on the line.

This brings us to another point of discussion: long-term goals. You don’t have to have a daily pension to be mapped, but you have to be in constant contact about big things (think: where you want to live, if you want children, if you want to shop and live, etc.). This can be the most fun part of the convoy and will also show if your visions for the future are consistent.

Everyone keeps in mind that everyone has different feelings, attitudes, and baggage when it comes to money. Share yours and listen with an open mind.

Keep listening to things you don’t agree with, but also try to create an environment without judgment. There is no one way better than the other. The most important thing is to take the time to check in regularly to stay on the same page. In a big thing and in a small thing.

On the Same Page? Nice to hear.

Right? But in reality, this is not always possible. *See above where we called the whole journey is different.

Our suggestion? Attention to resolve. Their study also shows that 62% of couples prefer to discuss alone. But there is no shame if it’s not your style. In fact, 11% are associated with a financial advisor. And 96% of the couples describe “happy”, it is more likely to solve by checking in on an expert.

Oh, and it can be tempting “to allow things to be once in time”. But factual couples that describe “unhappy” could not prevent confrontation. Not good.

So talk to your partner about money, yes. But also talk to your partner about how you can talk about money.

And who else – if anyone – has to deal with. It is also good to agree on what everyone “should” and “want” to do. And what is a “mistake”.

Suggestion: 52% of married couples admit to making a financial mistake on their way. Big surprise: Excessive spending is the most common.

Many couples seem to need a better budget.

a man and woman doing budgeting
Photo by Mikhail Nilov on Pexels.com

A budget is a must. And 25% of singles say it’s a warning signal as a potential partner. But that’s not the whole picture. Because 55% of couples say they will divorce their husband if they do not have a budget. A similar difference occurred when individuals and couples were asked to work with a financial advisor.

What can we learn from this? People are not always honest about their preferences and think about compatibility.

They seem to be more flexible than at the beginning of a relationship. But if you want to have the best chance of a happy future, move your true financial self forward, keep an open line of communication, and realize that things don’t always work.

No matter what your language of love is, it is important that you speak the same language of money as your partner. This way you can make smart financial moves – together. It’s romance now.

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Written by Anthony Clark

Anthony Clark, is an entrepreneur, writer and social-media manager. Driven by his passion for finance, business, & technology, he takes pride in providing the best growth hacks possible. His skills include website development, ad campaigns and client acquisition.

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